Learning how to install bollards and barriers can dramatically increase the security of parking lots, garages, storefronts and more, but only if they’re properly installed. Depending on the type and size of the bollards you’re installing, you may need to use heavy duty construction equipment to properly prepare the area, as well as concrete to finish the bollard post installation. This ensures that your barriers are as sturdy as possible, even when stopping a speeding vehicle. Ultimately, though, it all comes down to what exactly you're installing, and for what purpose.

Installing Embedded and Removable Bollards

Embedded and removable bollards have a more involved installation process than surface-mounted alternatives, but this can ultimately make them longer-lasting and less susceptible to tampering. To install these types of posts, you'll need to drill through the installation site using a high-powered auger, creating a hole significantly larger than the diameter of the bollard itself. At the bottom, you'll install gravel and a rebar cage to facilitate moisture drainage and reinforce the bollard. Finally, you'll install either the bollard itself or the removable bollard's ground sleeve, holding it in place while you fill the hole with cement.

Installing Surface-mounted Bollards and Barriers

Surface-mounted bollards and barriers can be considerably simpler and faster to install, as they do not require the same materials or process. Instead of drilling, lining and filling a hole in the ground, the bollard is installed directly into the surface. Surface-mounted posts come in two types: collapsible and fixed. While collapsible bollards can be lowered and raised to alternatively allow and block traffic, fixed ones cannot be removed without completely uninstalling them—not something that you should do on a regular basis. The surface-mounting process for fixed and collapsible bollards is less involved than an in-ground installation, but the posts themselves are not necessarily as secure, and may be vulnerable to tampering.   TrafficGaurd-BlogCTA-Quote